Accession Number:

ADA210971

Title:

The Combat Support Company--Rising from Its Own Ashes

Descriptive Note:

Monograph

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS SCHOOL OF ADVANCED MILITARY STUDIES

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1989-01-10

Pagination or Media Count:

59.0

Abstract:

This monograph discusses Infantry battalion organizational structure. Specifically, the issue is whether the Infantry battalion needs a combat support company CSC. In keeping with the current thinking of the Infantry school, there is one Infantry. Regardless of whether it is airborne, air assault, light, mechanized, or Bradley equipped, we have one Infantry. This monograph first discusses how Infantry battalion organizational structure has evolved from prior to World War II to the present, 1988. This includes a look at the German Army of WWII and the history of the U.S. Armys heavy weapons company and combat support company. Three times since WWII the heavy weapons company or combat support company has been disestablished. Twice it was resurrected within a few years. The present Infantry battalion does not have a combat support company. Next, the threat that will oppose the Infantry battalion across the spectrum of conflict is analyzed. The threat is viewed from the perspective of Soviet and Warsaw Pact Forces in central Europe, mid to high intensity conflict, to the variety of missions that fall into the realm of Low Intensity Conflict. Third, an analysis of AirLand Battle doctrine as expressed in our current manuals reveals the Infantry battalion organizational structure needed is one that is flexible, capable of limited independent operations and most importantly, enhances command and control.

Subject Categories:

  • Military Forces and Organizations

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE