Accession Number:

ADA209870

Title:

Laser Mixing Processes

Descriptive Note:

Final rept. 1 Jul 1977-31 Oct 1978

Corporate Author:

WASHINGTON UNIV SEATTLE COLL OF ENGINEERING

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1979-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

10.0

Abstract:

The high energy laser was made possible by the application of high speed fluid flow to basic molecular processes. The flow is used to remove waste heat, to provide a high mass flow for compactness and a high total pressure for gas recovery, to enhance lasing through reduced cavity temperatures, and to drop the density and thus the flow uniformity necessary for beam quality. Further, it is the rapid expansion of the plenum gas that provides non-equilibrium energy for the gasdynamic laser GDL, and provides fast mixing and upstream isolation for the chemical supersonic diffusion laser SDL. Thus, the 20-50 kwkgmsec output of modern high energy lasers is integrally tied to the development of a new class of fluid flows involving non-equilibriumreacting gases in a radiation-extraction cavity. High flow quality is essential if the laser beam is not to be degraded, and the wave systems, wakes, mixing layers, turbulence levels, and wall layers must be controlled. Consideration must be given to combustion processes in plenums and mixing layers, heat transfer in the expansion nozzles, aerodynamic beam-extraction windows, and downstream recovery of the working fluid to ambient conditions, in addition to the obvious concerns of efficiency and size. There are thus many reasons why laser possibilities are often paced by fluid dynamics.

Subject Categories:

  • Lasers and Masers
  • Fluid Mechanics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE