Accession Number:

ADA209756

Title:

Effect of Three-Dimensional Object Type and Density in Simulated Low- Level Flight

Descriptive Note:

Interim rept. Aug 1986-Dec 1988

Corporate Author:

DAYTON UNIV OH RESEARCH INST

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1989-05-01

Pagination or Media Count:

24.0

Abstract:

Altitude control in simulated low-level flight improves significantly when three-dimensional objects are added to simulator visual scenes. However, the limited processing capacity of computer image generators CIGs may be used either to increase the density of objects at the expense of individual object detail and realism, or to increase the detail of objects at the expense of object density. The present investigation sought to determine whether object density or object detail is the more important factor in simulated low-level flight. Three types of three-dimensional object were employed a a control condition consisting of inverted tetrahedrons the simplest possible three- dimensional shape b highly detailed and realistic pine tree and c a mixture of oak trees, pine trees, and bushed. The four levels of object density employed ranged from 3 objects per square mile to 175 objects per square mile. The task required a perceptual judgement to discriminate a change in altitude and a control action to reestablish the initial target altitude. Results indicated that object density had a greater effect on performance. Limited CIG processing capacity may, therefore, be more effectively used by increasing object density rather than individual object detail. Keywords Altitude cues Computer generated imagery Low level flight Object density Simulation Three dimensional objects detail.

Subject Categories:

  • Military Aircraft Operations
  • Human Factors Engineering and Man Machine Systems

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE