Accession Number:

ADA202359

Title:

Ricardo's Work as Viewed by Later Economists

Descriptive Note:

Technical rept.

Corporate Author:

STANFORD UNIV CA INST FOR MATHEMATICAL STUDIES IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1988-08-01

Pagination or Media Count:

16.0

Abstract:

David Ricardo was a peaceful man, well liked and admired for both his intellectual and his personal traits by his colleagues and rivals whether on the Stock Exchange, in the nascent field of political economy, or among the members of Parliament. He could maintain personal friendship and well behaved exchange of ideas with someone as strongly removed in both religion and economic doctrine as Thomas Malthus. The intellectual strength of his written work could dominate the thought of such a great mind as that of John Stuart Mill and rouse the writer Thomas de Quincey from his opium-riddled state to renewed mental vigor. Yet Ricardos posthumous reputation has been very variable. Many economists in the decades after his death attacked the realism of his theories, particularly with regard to population pressure. This document discusses varying views of Ricardos work by later economists.

Subject Categories:

  • Economics and Cost Analysis

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE