Accession Number:

ADA180535

Title:

Mood States at 1600 and 4300 Meters High Terrestrial Altitude,

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

ARMY RESEARCH INST OF ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE NATICK MA

Report Date:

1986-12-09

Pagination or Media Count:

6.0

Abstract:

Personal anecdotes imply that ascent to high altitude causes mood changes such as depression, apathy, and drowsiness. Also, behaviors at high altitude suggests that people are more argumentative, irritable, or euphoric. Since there are few systematic and quantitative studies assessing the effects of altitude on mood this study assessed mood at two different altitudes and times of day using a standardized scale. Self-rated moods were twice daily using the Clyde Mood Scale with 19 males and 16 females. Baseline control mood states were determined at 200 m. Moods were then assessed at 4300 m with one group and at 1600 m with the second group. Friendliness, clear thinking, dizziness, sleepiness, and unhappiness were affected at 4300 m. Only sleepiness changed at 1600 m. At altitude mood changes were different from baseline the day of arrival 1 - 4 hours, most severe after on day 18- 28 hours, and back to baseline levels by day 2 42 - 52 hours. Few time of day morning - evening differences were found. Therefore, this mood scale appears useful for assessing the effects of different altitudes on mood states. Keywords Psychological attitudes Interpersonal relations Emotions Psychological stress Acclimatization.

Subject Categories:

  • Medicine and Medical Research
  • Psychology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE