Accession Number:

ADA180393

Title:

Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (South Florida). PINK SHRIMP,

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

FLORIDA UNIV GAINESVILLE SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION

Report Date:

1983-10-01

Pagination or Media Count:

31.0

Abstract:

The pink shrimp Penaeus duorarum supports the most economically important commercial fishery in Florida. In 1981, exvessel landings, exclusive of the bait-shrimp catch, totalled 17 million pounds heads-off, valued at 45 million. Florida Bay and Charlotte HarborTampa Bay are the nursery areas providing recruitment stocks for the Tortugas and Sanibel grounds, respectively. Larval pink shrimp immigrate from the offshore spawning grounds to estuarine and coastal bay nursery areas, entering as postlarvae 8 to 10 mm TL. Monthly growth rates during the juvenile stage of development vary from 7 to 52 mm TL. Sexual maturity is attained at 9 to 10 weeks of age, or at sizes of 85 mm TL for females and 74 mm TL for males, after which time they emigrate to offshore waters for spawning. Spawning occurs year-round. Recruitment similarly occurs year-round, with a major peak in spring and a secondary peak in fall. Prerecruitment stocks in fall have increased during the past 2 decades, whereas those in spring have remained stable. Pink shrimp are fully recruited into the fishery at 120 mm TL. The pink shrimp functions in the marine ecosystem as both a predatory and a prey species. Pink shrimp, in estuarine habitats, tolerate a wide range of water temperatures 10 C to 35 C and salinities 5 to 47 ppt. Pollution by petrol - and non-petrol chemicals poses a potential contamination hazard to both pink shrimp and their estuarine habitats. Maintenance of the integrity of estuarine habitats is the most critical need in the management of pink shrimp for sustained exploitation.

Subject Categories:

  • Biology
  • Biological Oceanography

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE