Accession Number:

ADA175213

Title:

Acute T-2 Intoxication: Physiologic Consequences and New Therapeutic Approaches

Descriptive Note:

Annual rept. 1 Jan-15 Aug 1983

Corporate Author:

UNIFORMED SERVICES UNIV OF THE HEALTH SCIENCES BETHESDA MD

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1983-08-01

Pagination or Media Count:

25.0

Abstract:

The acute pathophysiological changes produced by Trichothecene mycotoxines are discussed. Symptoms reported following human attacks include a preponderance of autonomic symptoms, as well as blurred vision and convulsive movements, suggestive of involvement of the central nervous system. In experimental animals, a shock-like state accompanied by either paraplegia or ascending paralysis has been observed in several species. Taken together, these human and animal observations suggest that a major factor leading to death in cases of acute exposure may result from centrally mediated cardiovascular andor respiratory depression. Dose response toxicology studies for T-2 toxin in the awake guinea pig demonstrated no significant mortality and only minimal morbidity at doses below 0.75 mgkg however, mortality rate was 37 for animals given a dose of 1 mgkg i.v., and 73 for animals given a dose of 2 mgkg i.v. T-2 toxin, at high doses, produces profound bradycardia and hypotension. The relative lack of effect of N-methylatropine, combined with the extremely large increase in plasma catecholamines, suggests that the central nervous system, and particularly central parasympathetic pathways, may play a critical role in mediating the shock state. The beneficial effects of TRH on blood pressure indicate that continuous infusions of TRH, or utilization of TRH-analogs with longer half-lives, may have a beneficial action on the cardiodepression which accompanies T-2 toxin administration.

Subject Categories:

  • Toxicology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE