Accession Number:

ADA175074

Title:

Studies of the Biology of Phleboviruses in Sandflies.

Descriptive Note:

Annual rept. 31 Jan 84-31 Jan 86,

Corporate Author:

YALE UNIV NEW HAVEN CONN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1986-02-01

Pagination or Media Count:

16.0

Abstract:

The mechanism of phlebovirus maintenance in nature was studied using a Toscana virus - Phlebotomus perniciosus model. This is a natural virus-vector combination. A laboratory colony of Ph. perniciosus, chronically infected with Toscana virus, was established. Toscana virus was maintained in this sandfly colony by transovarial vertical transmission for 13 consective generations 23 months. Although the virus transovarial transmission rates tended to decrease in each subsequent generation, the results of this study demonstrate one method by which phleboviruses may be maintained in nature. Transovarial virus infection appeared to have no effect on the developing larvae or pupae. Likewise, the animal pathogenicity of the virus did not change after repeated vertical transmission in the sandfly colony. Transovarially infected Ph. perniciosus females were ables to transmit Toscana virus by bite to susceptible animals. Studies were also done in Lutzomyia gomezi with Arboledas virus, a new phlebovirus from colombia. Lu. gomezi females feeding on a viremic opossum were readily infected with arboledas virus, and virus replication occurred in the insects. Arboledas virus was transovarially transmitted by experimently infected Lu. gomezi to their F2 progeny. Five new colonies of phlebotomine sandflies were established Phlebotomus colabensis, longipalpis Colombia, Lu. gomezi, Lu. spinicrassa and Lu. abonnenci.

Subject Categories:

  • Medicine and Medical Research

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE