Accession Number:

ADA169572

Title:

Language and Community in Orwell's Anglo-India and in 1984.

Descriptive Note:

Final rept.,

Corporate Author:

ARMY MILITARY PERSONNEL CENTER ALEXANDRIA VA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1986-05-01

Pagination or Media Count:

30.0

Abstract:

What specifically separates a formulaic phrase from a considered phrase, the language of instinct from the language of intellect They share a similar grammar and appear in the same dictionary. In perhaps the most politically significant phase of Politics and the English Language, Orwell replaces formulaic phraseology with its social equivalent, suggesting that in orthodox writing substance and style are linked inseparably Orthodoxy, of whatever colour, seems to demand a lifeless, imitative style. The orthodox writer must use formulaic language he must express the insightful, forceful probe Orwell advocates in his essay, he will no longer be orthodox. Put another way, the incentive writer will lose membership in a club the one composed of orthodox people. Formulaic language, the kind most inimical to objective judgement, has a predominantly communal, not referential purpose.

Subject Categories:

  • Humanities and History
  • Linguistics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE