Accession Number:

ADA162550

Title:

Attention within Auditory Word Perception.

Descriptive Note:

Final rept. 1 Jan 82-31 Dec 83,

Corporate Author:

YALE UNIV NEW HAVEN CT DEPT OF PSYCHOLOGY

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1985-11-01

Pagination or Media Count:

58.0

Abstract:

Phonemic restoration is a powerful auditory illusion that arises when a phoneme is removed from a word and replaced with noise, resulting in a percept which sounds like the intact word with a spurious bit of noise. It is hypothesized that the configurational properties of the word impair attention to the individual phonemes and thereby induce perceptual restoration of the missing phoneme. If so, this impairment might be unlearned if listeners can process individual phonemes within a word selectively. Subjects received training with the potentially restorable stimuli 972 trials with feedback in addition, the presence or absence of an attentional cue, contained in a visual prime preceding each trial, was varied between groups of subjects. Cueing the identity and location of the critical phoneme of each test word allowed subjects to attend to the critical phoneme, thereby inhibiting the illusion, but only when the prime also identified the test word itself. When the prime only provided the identity or location of the critical phoneme, or only the identity of the word, subjects performed identically to those subjects for whom the prime contained no information at all about the test word. Furthermore, training did not produce any generalized learning about the types of stimuli used. A limited interactive model of auditory word perception is discussed, in which attention operates through the lexical level.

Subject Categories:

  • Linguistics
  • Psychology
  • Anatomy and Physiology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE