Accession Number:

ADA159903

Title:

Military Force May Not Be Ruled Out,

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

RAND CORP SANTA MONICA CA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1985-06-01

Pagination or Media Count:

6.0

Abstract:

This paper discusses how the United States should respond to terrorism. Are we powerless to do anything more than further fortify our embassies and warn all U.S. citizens that they depart our shores at their own peril We should not dismiss economic and diplomatic sanctions too readily. American corporations still do business as usual with Libya and Iran. We have not strongly pressured our allies to reduce their business dealings with countries that sponsor terrorism. We could clamp down more. The administration could lay out the evidence against a state sponsor of terrorism before the Congress and the American people, and seek a resolution authorizing actions consistent with belligerent status, including the use of force. If we do consider using military force, we must be clear--and realistic--about our objects. Military options are never attractive. The difficulties in applying military force make covert action look all the more attractive. In my view, however, although covert operations may be necessary extraordinary circumstances, if the United States is obliged to use force in response to terrorism, it ought to do so with the legitimately constituted armed forces of ths country, openly, with an unambiguous message as to who is responsible and why we are doing it.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Unconventional Warfare

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE