Accession Number:

ADA158864

Title:

Life Aboard a Soviet Destroyer and a Soviet Submarine

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

RAND CORP SANTA MONICA CA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1983-09-01

Pagination or Media Count:

26.0

Abstract:

This paper presents two fictionalized accounts of life at sea--one aboard a Soviet destroyer, the other aboard a Soviet submarine--based on articles that appeared in the open literature on the Soviet navy between 1973 to 1982. The articles dealt with such universal problems as crew training physical, psychological, political, and technological, ship design and weaponry, habitability living quarters, diet, fleet support, damage control, and repair capabilities. These scenarios represent worst cases as reflected in the literature they are not intended to portray normal or typical Soviet naval operations. They attempt, rather, to highlight the recurring problems that the Soviets address openly and that merit our examination because they bear on the Soviet navys ability to operate in peacetime, crisis, or conflict. Many of the weaknesses addressed in the destroyer section are also characteristic of submarine operations for example, officer-subordinate relationships, crew training, and inadequate sport facilities. These problems are exacerbated, however, by the confining and claustrophobic quarters of the submarine. The Soviets cite as problems the psychological burdens of underwater cruising associated with the proximity of the nuclear reactor to the electromechnical unit the acoustical properties of the vessel insufficient emotional and physical stimulation for the submarines personnel the absolute autonomy of the submarine many miles from base and the unfavorable oceanic climatic conditions in which the Soviet fleets must cruise.

Subject Categories:

  • Psychology
  • Stress Physiology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE