Accession Number:

ADA155564

Title:

Conceptualizing in Assembly Tasks.

Descriptive Note:

Interim technical rept. 1983-1985,

Corporate Author:

COLORADO UNIV AT BOULDER INST OF COGNITIVE SCIENCE

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1985-04-01

Pagination or Media Count:

37.0

Abstract:

This paper gives a method to determine a persons hypothetical conceptualization of an object -- its breakdown into subassemblies, subsubassemblies, and so on -- from the persons sequence of requests for pieces given a group of conceptualizations, there is a typical one. The hypothesis that assembly instructions presenting a typical conceptualization will yield better structural and functional performance than those presenting a minority one is supported experimentally. Conceptualizations are derived from objects built from memory and incorrectly by people who first studied typical or minority instructions. A new distance measure determines how far these conceptualizations are from those presented in the instructions. People studying typical instructions yield typical conceptualizations, and importantly, people studying minority instructions also yield typical conceptualizations, although they are significantly less typical than those from typical instructions. From the theoretical construct of conceptualizations and the methods of measuring them a practical principle, and a way to implement it, are found. The principle When a single set of procedural instructions is designed, it should present the conceptualization that the majority of people to be instructed by it bring to the situation naturally. Author

Subject Categories:

  • Psychology
  • Personnel Management and Labor Relations

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE