Accession Number:

ADA149904

Title:

Deployment Area Selection and Land Withdrawal/Acquisition. M-X/MPS (M-X/Multiple Protective Shelter) Environmental Technical Report. Native Vegetation.

Descriptive Note:

Preliminary final environmental impact statement.

Corporate Author:

HENNINGSON DURHAM AND RICHARDSON SANTA BARBARA CA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1981-10-02

Pagination or Media Count:

213.0

Abstract:

In the NevadaUtah study area, the major vegetation types are arid shrublands, with grazing as the principal land use. Small scattered patches of riparian and marsh vegetation provide essential wildlife habitats. North-south trending valleys are separated by mountain ranges dominated by woodlands, brushlands, and sparse forests. Drainage channels from the mountains carry deposits which coalesce into broad alluvial fans bajadas that transport water from snowmelt and intermittent rainstorms to central washes and playas. Playas occur at the lowest areas in the valleys and are intermittently flooded. Agriculture is confined to valley bottoms and low bajadas where the principal crop is alfalfa hay used for supplemental livestock feeding. Nevada counties in the study area range from about 0.2 to 2 percent cropland Utah counties in the study area have slightly more cropland, ranging from about 1 to 4 percent. In the TexasNew Mexico study area, irrigated croplands and heavily grazed rangelands predominate. The natural vegetation consists of mainly shrublands and several types of short grass prairie. Riparian vegetation and playa wetlands are important to wildlife. Most Texas counties in the study area are more than 50 percent cropland, whereas the New Mexico counties, except for Curry, have less than 30 percent cropland. Rangelands predominate in New Mexico counties U.S. Dept. of Commerce, 1974b. The native vegetation in both study areas is an important resource.

Subject Categories:

  • Biology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE