Accession Number:

ADA141712

Title:

Information Search in Judgment Tasks: The Effects of Unequal Cue Validity and Cost.

Descriptive Note:

Interim technical rept.,

Corporate Author:

ARIZONA UNIV TUCSON COLL OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1984-05-01

Pagination or Media Count:

31.0

Abstract:

The broad question addressed by this research is How good are humans at balancing the costs and benefits of their information acquisition Do they buy those, and only those, sources of information whose acquisition cost is outweighed by the improvement in decision quality that their use makes possible The evidence reported here, together with that reviewed earlier, suggests that the answer is not encouraging. Specifically, the present findings extend those noted earlier in suggesting 1 That the pattern of overpurchase for low-consequence decisions, and underpurchase for high-consequence decisions, is robust to variation in overall cue validity, as well as to procedural modifications such as manual versus computer-interactive transactions Experiment 1. 2 That overpurchase is frequently coupled with mispurchase Experiments 2 3. That is, subjects, in addition to buying overall more information than was normatively justified, frequently bought expensive cues when cheap, equally-valid ones were available Experiment 2, or low-validity cues when higher-validity, equally-costly cues were available Experiment 3. 3 That subjects perceive equally-valid cues as of differential validity Experiments 1 2, and are able to detect real validity differences between cues reliably only when the differences are large Experiment 3. Purchase behavior is generally shaped by these perceptions of validity, whether well-founded or not, though the relationship disappears when equally-valid cues are offered at different costs Experiment 2.

Subject Categories:

  • Administration and Management
  • Economics and Cost Analysis
  • Cybernetics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE