Accession Number:

ADA134047

Title:

Attributional Training versus Contact in Acculturative Learning: A laboratory Study

Descriptive Note:

Interim rept.

Corporate Author:

INDIANA UNIV-PURDUE UNIV AT INDIANAPOLIS

Report Date:

1983-09-30

Pagination or Media Count:

45.0

Abstract:

A culture assimilator, a programmed learning technique for teaching about another culture, was combined with behavioral contact to test for the joint effectiveness of the two approaches to acculturative training. 45 White male college students were randomly assigned to five training conditions in a modified Solomon four-group design. Results indicated significant differences between trained and untrained Ss on knowledge of Black culture and better behavioral performance as rated by Black confederates who were blind as to the training conditions for Ss receiving assimilator training followed by contact than the reverse condition. Apparently, the assimilator provides an opportunity to consolidate new attributions prior to their use in a real interaction. The reverse pattern interaction before the formation of new attributions is seen as anxiety producing and a test for the role of anxiety in intercultural training was generally positive. Possible implications of the results for cross- cultural training theory and methodology are discussed.

Subject Categories:

  • Sociology and Law
  • Humanities and History
  • Psychology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE