Accession Number:

ADA128371

Title:

Arctic Haze: Natural or Pollution?

Descriptive Note:

Interim rept. Aug 1978-Jul 1980

Corporate Author:

RHODE ISLAND UNIV NARRAGANSETT GRADUATE SCHOOL OF OCEANOGRAPHY

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1980-08-01

Pagination or Media Count:

143.0

Abstract:

The overall chemical composition of the Arctic aerosol was better defined sulfur and carbon dominate. Different MnV ratios on different sides of the Arctic were found both were inconsistent with eastern North American source. 222Rn data for Barrow were produced. They indicated a source to the north. Arguments were developed for a Eurasian source and against a North American source of Arctic aerosol. Chemical and physical aspects of long-range transport of polluted air masses to the Arctic were revealed by numerical simulation. The cloud-active fraction of the aerosol of Iceland was seen to parallel pollution-derived SO4 and V. Heating by Arctic aerosol in spring was calculated. Deposition of aerosol to the Arctic Ocean was estimated. High Br in North American Arctic in spring was noted--neither source nor effects is yet known. Trace-element composition of desert soils was found to be nearly constant within the aerosol-size range and form desert to desert, but highly variable for larger particles. Particle-size distributions of Fairbanks aerosol were estimated by inverting optical data. Cloudiness in the Arctic was found to be generally unchanged since 1920. Haze was reported in 114 of 3274 Ptarmigan flights, with greatest frequency in March-May.

Subject Categories:

  • Meteorology
  • Geology, Geochemistry and Mineralogy
  • Soil Mechanics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE