Accession Number:

ADA109630

Title:

Problems and Opportunities in the Design of Entrances to Ports and Harbors. Proceedings of a Symposium held August 13-15, 1980, Fort Belvoir, Virginia.

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL WASHINGTON DC MARINE BOARD

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1980-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

176.0

Abstract:

The most critical area of a port or harbor for navigation, maintenance, and potential effects on the physical and biological marine environment is the entrance. The entrance to a harbor or port might conveniently be described as that region of a ship channel between the open sea and the protected area of the harbor, including, on the seaward side, the nearby approach fairways, and on the harbor side, sufficient distance to permit a ship to stop. A number of considerations affect the design of this critical area the controllability of ships, transport and deposition of sediments, patterns and strength of waves, tides, and currents, interactions of ship traffic, environmental effects of structures and dredging operations, and others. Yet the development, testing, and improvement of reliable predictive models and development of a systems approach to the planning of these critical areas have not kept pace with the challenging demands of existing and projected needs for harbors and ports. Detailed attention is given to these subjects and their implications in the formal presentations collected in these proceedings.

Subject Categories:

  • Physical and Dynamic Oceanography
  • Civil Engineering
  • Marine Engineering

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE