Accession Number:

ADA109608

Title:

The Lome Conventions and Their Implications for the United States,

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

DEPARTMENT OF STATE WASHINGTON DC OFFICE OF EXTERNAL RESEARCH

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1981-11-01

Pagination or Media Count:

358.0

Abstract:

The Lome agreements which govern economic relations between the European Economic Community EEC or Community and the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group ACP have their origins in the Treaty of Rome, Signed in 1957. At its inception the European Economic Community was comprised of six members -- France, Belgium, Luxembourg, Italy, Germany and the Netherlands. At the insistence of the French, who had a large number of colonies in Africa, the Treaty designated as associates those eighteen African countries which had colonial ties with France and Belgium. Association meant a preferential tariff system between Europe and the African colonies, a program for overseas development assistance through the European Development Fund, and privileged commercial positions in the African countries for th entire European Community membership. With independence came the Yaounde Conventions I and II 1964-1975 which retained many of the same provisions as the association under the Treaty of Rome, but increased aid monies and lowered tariffs to create the approximation of a free-trade area between Europe and Africa. In addition, the Community entered the Arusha Convention 1970-1975 which liberalized trade relations with several East African states. Author

Subject Categories:

  • Economics and Cost Analysis
  • Government and Political Science

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE