Accession Number:

ADA094837

Title:

Forty-Eight Versus Twenty-Four Hour Duty for USAF Missile Crews: A Feasibility Study Using Subjective Measures of Fatigue.

Descriptive Note:

Final rept. Aug 78-Mar 80,

Corporate Author:

SCHOOL OF AEROSPACE MEDICINE BROOKS AFB TX

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1980-11-01

Pagination or Media Count:

58.0

Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of implementing a 48-hour work schedule for missile launch crews of a United States Air Force operational missile wing. A 90-day field test using two operational Minuteman missile squadrons as test and control groups was accomplished during the winter of 1978-1979 at Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota. Subjective reports of fatigue and the quantity and quality of sleep were recorded daily by crew members during work and while they were off duty. In addition, subjective reports of workload and disruptions of sleep were gathered during alerts. Subsets of data from at most 10 distributed alerts for each crew member were subjected to analyses of variance. The primary analyses were tests for differences between the responses of crew members working a new 48-hour vs. those working the standard 24-hour schedule. Scaled subjective reports of fatigue at the end of alert, after driving back to base, and after 24 hours of recovery indicated no significant differences between the two work schedules. Tests for interactions of the work schedules with activities during alerts, specific control centers, and cumulative or maturational effects over several alerts showed no effects that might have masked real differences between the work schedules. In conclusion, a recommendation was made that the 48-hour work schedule was feasible under the specific circumstances used in this study.

Subject Categories:

  • Psychology
  • Personnel Management and Labor Relations
  • Anatomy and Physiology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE