Accession Number:

ADA094467

Title:

Compatibility of Reticulated Foams in Typical Turbine Fuels with Currently Approved Additives.

Descriptive Note:

Interim technical rept. Mar-Dec 79,

Corporate Author:

DAYTON UNIV OH RESEARCH INST

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1980-09-01

Pagination or Media Count:

32.0

Abstract:

Reticulated polyester polyurethane foams have been successfully employed by the U.S. Air Force since the late 1960s in fuel tanks and dry bay areas of certain combat aircraft. Use of reticulated foams as fire and explosion retardants was initiated in 1965 when some Indianapolis 500 race cars were retrofitted with foam-filled fuel tanks to improve the crash resistance of the tanks. As a result of tests conducted for the USAF to verify the fire and explosion suppressing capability of foams, a nominal 10 pores per inch foam was produced in which all membranes in the cell structure were eliminated by thermal reticulation. During 1970 to 1972, lighter weight polyester materials were developed. These foams, which were yellow and red in color, result in a weight reduction of approximately 25 percent. The new foams also exhibited improved hydrolytic stability over the Type I orange foam which was susceptible to the combined effects of temperature and humidity. Development of a polyether polyurethane foam was initiated in 1974. The resulting dark blue and light blue foams, designated as MIL-B-83054B, Types IV and V, respectively, were intended to provide hydrolytic stability estimated to be five to ten times greater than that of the polyester materials.

Subject Categories:

  • Lubricants and Hydraulic Fluids
  • Plastics
  • Fuels

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE