Accession Number:

ADA093700

Title:

Cuba: The New Orthodoxy and the Resurgence of Fidel,

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

DEPARTMENT OF STATE WASHINGTON DC OFFICE OF EXTERNAL RESEARCH

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1976-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

8.0

Abstract:

The concluding months of 1975 saw Cuba again in the international spotlight. In November came the first disclosures that Cuban combat forces had been sent to aid the Marxist-oriented and Soviet-backed Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola MPLA in the civil war that had broken out in the newly independent African state. By mid-December, the Cuban build-up was estimated at between 3,000 to 5,000 troops, with the latter employing some 27 shiploads and 30 planeloads of Soviet equipment sent directly to Angola from the U.S.S.R. This was by far the largest contingent of Cuban military personnel sent overseas, dwarfing the 300 to 400 tank crew and air force personnel said to be Syria. While the Cuban involvement on behalf of the MPLA dramatized the Castro governments readiness to render material aid to leftist movements in the Third World, it also illustrated the extent to which Cuban foreign policy had become synchronized with, and supportive of, Soviet international objectives. In the meantime, Cubas Angolan involvement ended the cautious moves that had been undertaken by both Washington and Havana toward normalizing relations between the two countries.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE