Accession Number:

ADA093004

Title:

The Politics of Revolutionary Development: Civil-Military Relations in Cuba, 1959-1976,

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

DEPARTMENT OF STATE WASHINGTON DC OFFICE OF EXTERNAL RESEARCH

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1976-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

59.0

Abstract:

This paper examines the process of building a new political system in revolutionary Cuba, as reflected in the shifing relationship between the armed forces and the communist party. The institution-building process in Cuba was prolonged and difficult, lasting over a decade this was the result of the unique way in which the Cuban insurrection developed. The Cuban revolution was the first socialist revolution to succeed without a Leninist party in the vanguard of the revolutionary struggle. Instead, the armed forces fulfilled the vanguard role usually played by the communist party. A new party was not inaugurated until 1965, and even then it remained so weak during the 1960s that it was incapable of assuming the directive role in the political process from the armed forces. The paper summarizes the building of the new party, examines the partys weaknesses, and details its relationship to the armed forces during the 1960s. It is argued that the military was not only impervious to party control, but that it wielded considerable influence in the party as a whole.

Subject Categories:

  • Humanities and History

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE