Accession Number:

ADA089752

Title:

Aircraft Turbine Engine Monitoring Experience: An Overview and Lessons Learned from Selected Case Studies.

Descriptive Note:

Interim rept.,

Corporate Author:

RAND CORP SANTA MONICA CA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1980-08-01

Pagination or Media Count:

112.0

Abstract:

Two approaches have evolved in attempts to improve engine operations, maintenance, and management while reducing support costs. The first concentrates on short-term practices inflight data are recoreded in a snapshot mode. The second approach focuses on long-term benefits through improved knowledge of the operating environment. Data must be recorded continuously on at least a few aircraft. Engine duty-cycle research by the military services has demonstrated that neither the services nor the manufactures have a clear idea of power requirements and frequent throttle movements during operational sorties in fighter aircraft and have generally overestimated engine parts life and underexpected life-cycle costs. The narrow concept of cost savings over the short term should not be the sole criterion on which monitoring systems are judged. Monitoring systems for recent and future engines should include continuously recorded data now that reliability, durability, and cost issues are almost on an equal footing with performance. Author

Subject Categories:

  • Attack and Fighter Aircraft
  • Jet and Gas Turbine Engines

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE