Accession Number:

ADA088802

Title:

Undergraduate Pilot Training: Instructor Pilot Behavior and Student Stress and Performance

Descriptive Note:

Interim rept. Jun-Sep 1979

Corporate Author:

ARIZONA STATE UNIV TEMPE DEPT OF HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Report Date:

1980-07-01

Pagination or Media Count:

21.0

Abstract:

Research has shown flying training to be a very stressful experience. Stress appears to be greater in less capable students. One of the most salient stress producing agents in pilot training is the instructor pilot. Studies have shown that instructor pilot behavior can be quantified and its stress-producing quality measured. The stress response of students can be assessed via measurement of cathecholamines excreted into the urine. The present research examined the interaction between instructor and student during selected rides of the instrument phase of T-37 training. Two issues were addressed Quantification of Instructor Pilot behavior and its relation to student stress and performance. Six instructor pilots and 12 students served as subjects. Instrument training sorties in the T-50 instrument flight simulator were tape recorded and analyzed to determine the frequency of 12 categories of instructor pilot behavior. Student stress levels were determined through analysis of urine samples collected immediately following each sortie. Four instructors were found to use a generally positive teaching style and two a negative style. Stress was greater in students of negative instructors. Negative correlations were obtained between student performance and several instructor pilot behaviors.

Subject Categories:

  • Humanities and History
  • Psychology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE