Accession Number:

ADA088147

Title:

The Ideas of Frederick W. Taylor: An Evaluation

Descriptive Note:

Technical rept.

Corporate Author:

MARYLAND UNIV COLLEGE PARK COLL OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1980-08-01

Pagination or Media Count:

46.0

Abstract:

The ideas and techniques of Frederick W. Taylor, the founder of Scientific Management, were examined with respect to their validity and their degree of acceptance in modern management. With respect to the principle of scientific decision-making and techniques such as time and motion study, standardization, goal setting with feedback, money as a motivator, management responsibility for training, scientific selection, the shortened work week and rest pauses, Taylors views were fundamentally correct and have been generally accepted. With respect to individualized work and the principle of labor- management cooperation, his views were probably only partially correct and have been only partially accepted. Criticisms of Taylor with respect to his alleged inadequate view of motivation, ignorance of social factors, authoritarianism, treatment of men as machines, exploitation of workers, anti-unionism, and personal dishonesty are predominantly or wholly false. The accusation concerning over-specialization is only partially justified. Generally Taylors contributions and his genius have not been understood or appreciated by contemporary writers.

Subject Categories:

  • Administration and Management

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE