Accession Number:

ADA080409

Title:

Integral Equation Space-Energy Flux Synthesis for Spherical Systems.

Descriptive Note:

Doctoral thesis,

Corporate Author:

AIR FORCE INST OF TECH WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB OH SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1979-09-01

Pagination or Media Count:

81.0

Abstract:

The calculation of neutron flux distribution and growth rate for small, spherically symmetric systems usually requires extensive computing time on the largest machines. To minimize computing time, a compromise between the simplicity of diffusion theory and the accuracy of transport theory is needed. The Serber-Wilson method, Feynmans method, and early flux synthesis methods are used as the foundation for integral equation synthesis IES which is an approximate, numerical technique for obtaining the spatial and energy neutron flux distributions in multiplying systems. In IES, the integral form of the neutron transport equation is specialized to spatial dependence only, and then solved numerically for the two lowest order eigenfunctions. Similar specialization to energy dependence only yields a second set of trial eigenfunctions. Using standard perturbation methods, the two sets of trial eigenfunctions are synthesized into a single, two-dimensional solution. The IES technique was used to calculate the flux and multiplication factor, k, of the critical plutonium sphere, Jezebel. Results for k agreed to within 0.01 of published values, whereas the spatial flux, when normalized at the center, agreed to within 8 at the outer assembly boundary. The Jezebel calculation using IES required about 90 seconds CPU time on an IBM 36075. Highly sophisticated codes require approximately ten minutes of CDC 7600 CPU time to compute the Jezebel flux and growth rate. Author

Subject Categories:

  • Nuclear Physics and Elementary Particle Physics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE