Accession Number:

ADA080205

Title:

Some New Developments in Chemistry of Metallophthalocyanines.

Descriptive Note:

Interim rept.,

Corporate Author:

TEXAS A AND M UNIV COLLEGE STATION DEPT OF CHEMISTRY

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1980-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

53.0

Abstract:

Like many of the great moments in science, the chemistry of phthalocyanine and metallophthalocyanines began by an accidental discovery. In 1907, Braun and Tcherniac heated an alcoholic solution of o-cyanobenzamide in order to study some of its properties. After cooling, small amounts of a blue compound precipitated. The precipitate turned out to be phthalocyanine. This was the first time phthalocyanine was synthesized. In 1927, de Diesbach and von der Weid attempted to prepare o-xylenedicyanide from a mixture of o-dibromobenzene and cuprous cyanide by heating in pyridine at 200 C. However, they obtained a blue compound containing copper. Later this blue compound was identified as copperII-phthalocyanine. Thus, the preparation of the first metallophthalocyanine was also an accident. In the early 1930s, Linstead and his co-workers synthesized many metallophthalocyanines and reported that a phthalocyanine ligand consists of four units of isoindole and has a highly conjugated system. In 1933, for the first time, he used the term phthalocyanine, which comes from the Greek naphtha rock oil and cyanide dark blue. Later Robertson et al. elucidated the structures of phthalocyanine and nickelII, copperII, and platinumII phthalocyanines using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Since that time, many studies have been done on semiconductivity, photoconductivity, photochemical reactivity, photosynthetic activity, luminescence, and fluorescence which are based on the highly conjugated system of phthalocyanine and metallophthalocyanines.

Subject Categories:

  • Organic Chemistry

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE