Accession Number:

ADA065040

Title:

Individual Differences in Knowledge Acquisition from Maps

Descriptive Note:

Technical rept. Nov 1977-May 1978

Corporate Author:

RAND CORP SANTA MONICA CA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1979-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

61.0

Abstract:

This study investigated the strategies people use to acquire knowledge from maps. Three expert and five novice map users studied a map and provided verbal protocols of their study behavior. Analysis of the learning protocols suggested four categories of processes that were invoked during learning attention, encoding, evaluation, and control. Large individual differences in both performance and strategy usage were observed in this task. Analyses of the performance and strategy data revealed that the use of certain strategies in each category, particularly those used for encoding spatial information, was most predictive of learning performance. In addition, good learners differed from poor learners in their ability to evaluate their learning progress and to focus their attention on learned information. An analysis of the performance of map-using experts suggested that success in learning depended on strategies and not on familiarity with the task domain or materials. The implications of these results for training extertise in map learning are discussed.

Subject Categories:

  • Humanities and History
  • Psychology
  • Cartography and Aerial Photography

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE