Accession Number:

ADA059084

Title:

Biochemical Changes in Tissues During Infectious Illness. The Bioenergetics of Infection and Exercise.

Descriptive Note:

Annual progress rept. no. 13, 1 Jul 77-30 Jun 78,

Corporate Author:

RUTGERS - THE STATE UNIV NEW BRUNSWICK N J

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1978-06-01

Pagination or Media Count:

19.0

Abstract:

Forcing animals to run on treadmills resulted in several problems due to the traumatic effects on the forced animals. These problems are being resolved by the use of motorized running wheels. Rats infected with S. typhimurium and fed a corn oil diet but not allowed access to running wheels had more disease effects on liver constituents than did rats exercising voluntarily in the latter only RNA, protein, histidine, the leucines and cholesterol were increased. Rats fed a synthetic source of energy showed little disease effects in either exercising or non-exercising groups. In other studies, dietary restriction induced voluntary runnings in nephrectomized rats but not to the extent observed in shams and non-operated controls. Ad libitum feeding of a lysine deficient diet induced voluntary running to levels comparable with restricted feed intakes. It is speculated that a deficiency of any dietary essential that limits growth will induce hyperactivity. Preliminary data indicate that the growth of rats and chicks may be completely arrested and stabilized without damage to the integrity of the metabolic system. Dietary caffeine was incorporated into such a model and wheel running response appeared to be quite sensitive to the level of the caffeine in the diet the lowest level depressed running activity below controls while the higher dosages increased running wheel activity. Author

Subject Categories:

  • Biochemistry
  • Anatomy and Physiology
  • Medicine and Medical Research

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE