Accession Number:

ADA045677

Title:

Congress and Competition

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

RAND CORP SANTA MONICA CA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1977-04-01

Pagination or Media Count:

13.0

Abstract:

This paper examines the prospect of promoting greater competition in acquiring major weapons systems from the perspective of the Congress. Congressionsl support for competition derives from its promise of both direct and indirect benefits. The primary direct benefits are lower prices and greater technological achievement. An additional perceived benefit stems from the view that competition insures fairness. Among factors militating against support for greater competition are increasing interest in interservice commonality, the evolution of defense spending into an important tool of social and economic policy, and the relationships of the Congress to the defense industry and the military. The author concludes that Congress would not favor rigid price competition that would close off distributional non-price and non-performance considerations. Additionally, a hard-shell of the cost benefits of any advanced competitive acquisition strategy will miss its mark if 1 the strategy clearly reduces congressional flexibility, or 2 it is not supplemented by appeals to considerations other than cost savings.

Subject Categories:

  • Administration and Management
  • Economics and Cost Analysis
  • Government and Political Science

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE