Accession Number:

ADA045629

Title:

Stress Responses of Pilots Flying High-Performance Aircraft during Aerial Combat Maneuvers

Descriptive Note:

Final rept. Apr 1975-Apr 1977

Corporate Author:

SCHOOL OF AEROSPACE MEDICINE BROOKS AFB TX

Report Date:

1977-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

9.0

Abstract:

In aerial combat maneuvers ACMs, at Luke AFB, AZ, eight pilots flew their two F-15 aircraft against nine pilots in three F-106 aircraft. A total of nine flights, consisting of 23 ACMs, were accomplished in 5 successive days. The degrees of fatigue, stress, and sympathetic activity were quantified using both subjective analyses and the biochemical constituents in the urine of the pilots of the F-15 or F-106. Biochemical indicators, reported per 100 mg creatinine, included epinephrine, norepinephrine, 17-OHCS, urea, inorganic phosphate, sodium, potassium, and sodiumpotassium ratio. The F-106 pilots exerted more relative effort than did the F-15 pilots--effort which appeared to be associated with high-G experience. Both groups of pilots were equally fatigued following ACMs however, only the fatigue of the F-106 pilots was directly correlated with the length of the ACM. Sympathetic and stress responses during the ACM--similar for both groups of pilots--showed postflight increases of 54 in epinephrine, 19 in norepinephrine, and 20 in 17-OHCS over preflight values, thus suggesting a moderate stress response. Resting levels of these same indicators, for days the pilots did not fly and for pre-ACM values, were similar but higher than control values previously reported for other stressful activities. By late afternoon, postflight values for these indicators had returned to near-preflight levels.

Subject Categories:

  • Stress Physiology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE