Accession Number:

ADA045597

Title:

Goal Setting, Evaluation Apprehension and Social Cues as Determinants of Job Performance and Job Satisfaction.

Descriptive Note:

Technical rept.,

Corporate Author:

WASHINGTON UNIV SEATTLE DEPT OF PSYCHOLOGY

Report Date:

1977-09-01

Pagination or Media Count:

26.0

Abstract:

A simulated organizational setting involving a routine clerical task was the experimental context for the research. One hundred and four subjects were randomly assigned in a factorial design--including two levels of goal setting, two levels of evaluation apprehension, and three types of social cues--to investigate the effects of the independent variables on employee productivity and job satisfaction. The results showed that people with assigned goals produced more than people without assigned goals people with high evaluation apprehension produced more than people with low evaluation apprehension and people receiving positive social cues produced more than people receiving negative social cues. The independent variables had no main effect on overall job satisfaction but did affect attitudes about job pressure, boredom, and satisfaction with ones performance. These results are discussed in terms of their relevance for current theories of task performance and for applications in organizational settings. Author

Subject Categories:

  • Psychology
  • Personnel Management and Labor Relations

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE