Accession Number:

ADA043649

Title:

Effects of Simulator Training and Platform Motion on Air-to-Surface Weapons Delivery Training

Descriptive Note:

Final rept. Aug 1976-Mar 1977

Corporate Author:

AIR FORCE HUMAN RESOURCES LAB BROOKS AFB TX

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1977-07-01

Pagination or Media Count:

50.0

Abstract:

The objectives of this research were to determine a the extent to which generalized, conventional, air-to-surface AS weapons delivery training in the Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training ASPT transferred to a specific aircraft b the contribution of six-degree-of-freedom platform motion to the transfer of training from simulator to aircraft and c the differential effects, if any, of this simulator training on student pilots of differing ability levels. Twenty-four students progressed through lead-in training, receiving all training except the AS flights, and were then assigned into matched experimental and control groups. All of the subjects received academic training in weapons delivery techniques and procedural training on F-5B operations. At this point, the students in the control groups flew two data collection sorties in the F-5B aircraft, performing 10, 15, and 30 deg, bomb deliveries. The experimental groups received AS weapons delivery training in ASPT on 10, 15, and 30 deg bomb deliveries with a fixed number of trials on each event. The experimental subjects then received two data collection flights in the F-5B identical to those received by the control group. Analysis of the results proved that simulator training significantly increased air-to-surface weapons delivery skills e.g., approximately double the number of qualifying bombs, a one-fourth reduction in circular error but that platform motion was not a contributing factor in this process. It was also found that novice student pilots of greater initial ability benefit most from such simulator training when a minimum fixed number of trials is used.

Subject Categories:

  • Aircraft
  • Humanities and History

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE