Accession Number:

ADA036629

Title:

North Atlantic Regional Water Resources Study. Appendix H. Minerals.

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

BUREAU OF MINES WASHINGTON D C

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1972-05-01

Pagination or Media Count:

109.0

Abstract:

The mineral industry of the North Atlantic Region is important to both the local and the national economy, with total production valued at 1.3 billion in 1970. The leading commodities were anthracite, bituminous coal, cement, crushed stone, and sand and gravel. The high-level production of construction materials reflects the urban-industrial density of the region. Other important mineral commodities were iron ore, lime, dimension stone, and zinc. Future mineral production potential is good within the Region and the opening of new mines can be anticipated. Technologic developments in mineral extraction and processing will play a part in expanding the development of mineral resources, but a timetable of such events cannot be made at present. An adequate water supply is essential to the production of most mineral commodities, and mineral deposits are usually not considered to be viable if water is not available. Mineral processing causes little consumptive loss of water but, like all uses of water, it degrades the quality to some degree. The extent of degradation of process water can be maintained within tolerable limits. The presence of sulfide minerals in and adjacent to the mineral being mined has caused serious pollution problems locally, and, in the case of coal, many miles of streams have been adversely affected. Areas and sites known to contain minerals have been described and shown on maps to aid future planning for individual river basins. Principal emphasis has been given to those minerals whose recovery requires the use of water or may affect water.

Subject Categories:

  • Administration and Management
  • Geology, Geochemistry and Mineralogy

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE