Accession Number:

ADA026359

Title:

Research Development in the Glass Fiber Sodium-Sulfur Battery.

Descriptive Note:

Semi-annual rept. 1 Jul-31 Dec 1975

Corporate Author:

DOW CHEMICAL U S A WALNUT CREEK CA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1975-12-31

Pagination or Media Count:

31.0

Abstract:

The sodium-sulfur battery based on hollow glass fibers as the electrolyte has been shown to have outstanding characteristics as a rechargeable cell. It should be capable of 100 watt hours per pound at over 80 watts per pound, and not be damaged by chargedischarge cycling. The major problems are to obtain increased lifetimes, to demonstrate non-variance in its electrochemical characteristics over thousands of cycles, and to assemble the cells into metal envelopes and into high voltage batteries. The batteries, like the cells, must be capable of long-lived non-variant operation. The problems are being defined and attacked by building and operating various size hollow fiber cells. These cells range from single fiber cells to cells containing many thousands of fibers. When these cells fail, the failure mode is analyzed. Small assemblies are designed and built that can test specific parts of the cells which may be involved in the failure. For example, single fibers or small bundles of fibers can be assembled and used as a Na anode discharging and charging into a sodium or a sulfide pool to test the effect of passage of sodium ions on the glass lifetime. As improvements are made, the cells are scaled up to confirm the improvements and to see if scaling up introduces new factors affecting the cell lifetime.

Subject Categories:

  • Electrochemical Energy Storage
  • Refractory Fibers
  • Textiles

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE