Accession Number:

ADA025893

Title:

A Survey of 'Quick Wins' in Modern War

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

HISTORICAL EVALUATION AND RESEARCH ORGANIZATION DUNN LORING VA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1975-10-01

Pagination or Media Count:

125.0

Abstract:

It may be safely assumed that offensive operations are always launched with the hope of achieving a victory in as short a time as possible. It would be hard to find an instance in history when the attacker deliberately sought a protracted campaign, whether he measured length in modern terms of days or weeks or whether he measured in months or years, like the Mongols sweeping west into Europe. What factors, then, result in quick success to some, and cause others to stop short of success, or end in a stalemate, with neither side making appreciable advances. In an attempt to identify the factors which seem to have contributed to or militated against, rapid and decisive victory, seven examples of quick wins in modern war, three examples of almost quick wins and three examples that ended in stalemate were studied. The examples studied are Quick wins--British Megiddo Campaign in Palestine and Syria, 1918 German invasion of the Low Countries and France, 1940 Japanese invasion of Malaya, 1941-1942 Soviet invasion of Manchuria, 1945 Third Arab-Israeli War, 1967. Almost quick wins--German invasion of Russia Operation Barbarossa, 1941 Allied breakout from Normandy Operation Cobra, 1944 North Korean invasion of South Korea, 1950. Stalemates--Sinai Desert Front, 1915-1917 Winter and Gustav Lines, Italy, 1943-1944 Korea, 1951-1953.

Subject Categories:

  • Military Intelligence
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE