Accession Number:

ADA024661

Title:

A Bioenvironmental Study of Emissions from Refuse Derived Fuel.

Descriptive Note:

Final rept.,

Corporate Author:

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH LAB MCCLELLAN AFB CALIF

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1976-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

113.0

Abstract:

Refuse derived fuel processed municipal solid waste was used as a supplement to coal in a utility boiler 80,000 lbs. steam per hour. Furnance emissions were determined from coal, and from 11 and 21 mixes by volume of refuse derived fuel RDF and coal respectively. In comparison with coal, the 11 mix had significantly lower sulfur dioxide, hydrocarbon and nitrogen oxide emission levels. Particulate emissions were unchanged. Lead, chloride and fluoride emissions were significantly increased. The 21 mix had lower SO2 and HC emission levels but higher Nitrogen oxide emissions and erratic particulate emissions. Lead, chloride and fluoride emissions were significantly increased. Operators had difficulty controlling furnance temperature, fuel distribution and fuel air ratios during use of the 21 mix. Except for increased lead emissions, the use of RDF in a 11 mix with coal was favorably indicated. The increased emission of lead creates a complex environmental question. No Federal emission or air quality standard for lead has been promulgated and scientific controversy exists as to an accepted level for airborne lead. The EPA has not proposed any standards, but has issued an opinion calling for the reduction of lead whenever possible. Any planned use of RDF in units not equipped with efficient particulate control devices efficient forsubmicrometer particles must address the problem of increased lead emission. Lead was found predominantly in the submicrometer particle size fraction. Particles in the stack effluent contained 245 times more lead than particles collected by a multiclone.

Subject Categories:

  • Combustion and Ignition
  • Fuels
  • Air Pollution and Control

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE