Accession Number:

ADA022239

Title:

Stress Wave Generation in Solids Using a Low Power Laser,

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

CALIFORNIA UNIV LOS ANGELES SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1975-12-01

Pagination or Media Count:

79.0

Abstract:

This thesis is concerned with both the experimental and theoretical aspects of thermally generated stress waves in nondispersive solids. The initial purpose was to determine whether a detectable stress wave could be generated in a solid by exposing a surface to energy from a low power about 75 watts peak, pulsed solid state laser. Previous experimenters have used high power 1 megawatt lasers to deliver pulses of energy to a sample. The advantages of the solid state laser are its nondestructive nature, safety, size, and cost. Aluminum and glass bars were used as samples, and X-cut quartz transducers were used to detect the stress waves. To increase the absorption of the laser energy, the target surface of each sample was blackened. Thermal stress waves generated due to absorption of laser energy were detected. For comparison with the experimental results, the one dimensional thermoelastic wave equation was solved using impulse response techniques. A theoretical prediction for the shape of the generated stress waves was obtained.

Subject Categories:

  • Lasers and Masers
  • Ceramics, Refractories and Glass
  • Metallurgy and Metallography

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE