Accession Number:

ADA021844

Title:

Feasibility of Using Aluminum Conductor Cables for Shore-to-Ship Electrical Power Service

Descriptive Note:

Final rept. Jul 1974-Sep 1975

Corporate Author:

CIVIL ENGINEERING LAB (NAVY) PORT HUENEME CA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1976-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

17.0

Abstract:

Electrical power is currently supplied to ships while in port by cable with three copper conductors. At 6 pounds per foot, such cable weighs 600 pounds or more. The Civil Engineering Laboratory conducted a feasibility study to determine if aluminum, rather than copper, could be used as the conductor and thus reduce the weight of the cable. Results of the study indicate that aluminum conductors would cause more problem than would be solved by their use increased cross section area, reduced flexibility, increased rate of fatigue, and increased susceptibility to corrosion. In addition, the aluminum conductor cable manufacturers contacted indicated their reluctance to produce a cable with the number of fine aluminum strands required. Another part of the study was to determine whether increased cable size would reduce the surface temperature of the cable to enable personnel to handle it without burning their hands. Though a slight reduction was possible by increasing the size of the conductor, the largest temperature changes would result from eliminating direct exposure of the cable to the sun.

Subject Categories:

  • Electrical and Electronic Equipment

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE