Accession Number:

ADA012671

Title:

Self-Disclosure on Army Surveys: Survey Procedures and Respondent Beliefs Related to Candidness.

Descriptive Note:

Technical rept.,

Corporate Author:

HUMAN RESOURCES RESEARCH ORGANIZATION ALEXANDRIA VA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1975-04-01

Pagination or Media Count:

73.0

Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to analyze the beliefs and attitudes of military personnel that influence their willingness to provide candid information on surveys concerned with various social problem areas, such as drugs, racial prejudice and dissatisfaction with the Army. Data were collected by means of questionnaires that required the respondent to place himself in hypothetical situations with different types of survey administrators, guarantees of confidentiality, and survey topics. The respondent indicated his willingness to give candid information on each problem area with each administrator with each guarantee of confidentiality. There were 1,490 subjects surveyed from four Army posts in the continental United States E1-E9, 01-03. The respondents were found to be most willing to give candid information of surveys administered by a civilian under anonymous procedures or, especially, randomized inquiry procedures. Officers were found to have a strong preference for randomized inquiry, supporting earlier work. Career-oriented personnel indicated a greater reluctance to divulge sensitive information about themselves. Personnel of all ranks showed strong concern over the ability to identify their anonymous responses by using demographic data. Findings indicated that few respondents would believe guarantees that survey information was to be used for research purposes only. Author

Subject Categories:

  • Sociology and Law
  • Personnel Management and Labor Relations

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE