Accession Number:

ADA011867

Title:

Suitability of Animal Species and Strains for Testing Carcinogenic Risk for Man.

Descriptive Note:

Final rept.,

Corporate Author:

AEROSPACE MEDICAL RESEARCH LAB WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB OHIO

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1974-12-01

Pagination or Media Count:

33.0

Abstract:

Testing for the safety of chemicals to which human population groups are exposed requires animals, and important considerations in such studies include the choice of animal models, the diet, housing and handling and the interpretation of results. Chemicals may be administered in the diet, by gastric intubation, by intraperitoneal injection, intratracheal intubation, by aerosol or by other means. The most practical route by exposure, in keeping with safety, is that which is closest to the manner in which humans may be exposed. The authors have explored the use of a number of species of laboratory animals in carcinogenesis studies and selected examples are discussed in this paper. Problems associated with the use of mice in safety evaluations are alluded to and the use of animal studies to identify potential human carcinogens is pointed out.

Subject Categories:

  • Animal Husbandry and Veterinary Medicine
  • Toxicology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE