Accession Number:

ADA003128

Title:

The Gaseous Environment and Temperature Regulation.

Descriptive Note:

Final technical rept. 1 Jan 72-31 Aug 73,

Corporate Author:

INDIANA UNIV BLOOMINGTON

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1974-11-01

Pagination or Media Count:

116.0

Abstract:

The greater sweating capacity of the acclimatized man has been attributed to either changes in the sensitivity of the central thermoregulatory center or to local changes in sweating capacity of the glands. In the present study resistance hygrometry was used to further elucidate the nature of the increased sweating capacity following short term heat acclimation. Results indicate that the higher sweating output following acclimation is due essentially to an amplification of the thermoregulatory function at the periphery, possibly at the neuroglandular junction or at the level of the gland itself. A physiological warm skin temperature seems to be a necessary condition in this functional modification, but a higher skin temperature does not affect significantly in the modification of the sweat gland function during the acclimation. The changes in the ionic concentrations of extracellular fluid, in enzymatic systems, or in the levels of hormones may enhance the capacity of sweat secretion.

Subject Categories:

  • Anatomy and Physiology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE