Accession Number:

AD1107509

Title:

The United States Army and Security Force Assistance : The Shortcomings of Advisors Conducting Security Force Assistance and the Future

Descriptive Note:

Technical Report

Corporate Author:

AIR UNIV MAXWELL AFB AL MAXWELL AFB

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2019-06-01

Pagination or Media Count:

81.0

Abstract:

The United States government, the Department of Defense and other entities have a long history of providing advisory aid to foreign governments and militaries. Aid has been accompanied by advisors used for Foreign Internal Defense and Security Force Assistance missions for militaries and governments struggling against domestic unrest. Military advisors, however, have often been assigned to advising on an ad hoc basis or haphazard manner and deployed with little or no relevant training. The Army has recently recognized the need for more advisors as this type of aid is growing in importance within the U.S. government and Department of Defense. The Army has designed a program to institute six new brigades called Security Force Assistance Brigades SFAB. Do the SFABs point to the future of Army advising and has the program learned from past mistakes Empirical case studies of Korea, Vietnam, and Iraq provide a benchmark against which the new SFABs can be compared and contrasted. The central argument of this thesis is that the United States has not put an emphasis on Security Force Assistance, particularly as it pertains to conventional forces executing the mission. This will be established by examining the advisory efforts in Korea, Vietnam, and Iraq. By identifying the good and bad from each theater, it will provide a baseline to examine the new SFABs. In examining the new SFABs, it will look at where they have learned from past mistakes and where they are making the same mistakes.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE