Accession Number:

AD1100203

Title:

A diet of U.S. military food rations alters gut microbiota composition and does not increase intestinal permeability

Descriptive Note:

Journal Article - Open Access

Corporate Author:

ARMY NATICK SOLDIER RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER MA NATICK United States

Report Date:

2019-07-30

Pagination or Media Count:

11.0

Abstract:

Interactions between gut microbes and dietary components modulate intestinal permeability IP and inflammation. Recent studies have reported altered fecal microbiota composition together with increased IP and inflammation in individuals consuming military food rations in austere environments, but could not isolate effects of the diet from environmental factors. To determine how the U.S. Meal, Ready-to-Eat food ration affects fecal microbiota composition, IP and inflammation, 60 adults 95 male,1861 years were randomized to consume their usual ad libitum diet for 31 days CON or a strictly controlled Meal, Ready-to-Eat-only diet for 21 days followed by their usual diet for 10 days MRE. In both groups, fecal microbiota composition was measured before, during INT, days 121 and after the intervention period. IP and inflammation high-sensitivity C-reactive protein hsCRP were measured on days 0, 10, 21 and 31. Longitudinal changes in fecal microbiota composition differed between groups P.005, and fecal samples collected from MRE during INT were identified with 88 accuracy using random forest models. The genera making the strongest contribution to that prediction accuracy included multiple lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, which demonstrated lower relative abundance in MRE, and several genera known to dominate the ileal microbiota Streptococcus, Veillonella, Clostridium, the latter two demonstrating higher relative abundance in MRE. IP and hsCRP were both lower 34 and 41 , respectively in MRE relative to CON on day 21 P.05 but did not differ otherwise. Findings demonstrate that a Meal, Ready-to-Eat ration diet alters fecal microbiota composition and does not increase IP or inflammation.

Subject Categories:

  • Food, Food Service and Nutrition

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE