Accession Number:

AD1099560

Title:

Pressure Cycling Technology for Challenging Proteomic Sample Processing: Application to Barnacle Adhesive

Descriptive Note:

Journal Article - Open Access

Corporate Author:

NAVAL RESEARCH LAB WASHINGTON DC WASHINGTON United States

Report Date:

2019-05-29

Pagination or Media Count:

13.0

Abstract:

Successful proteomic characterization of biological material depends on the development of robust sample processing methods. The acorn barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite is a biofouling model for adhesive processes, but the identification of causative proteins involved has been hindered by their insoluble nature. Although effective, existing sample processing methods are labor and time intensive, slowing progress in this field. Here, a more efficient sample processing method is described which exploits pressure cycling technology PCT in combination with protein solvents. PCT aids in protein extraction and digestion for proteomics analysis. Barnacle adhesive proteins can be extracted and digested in the same tube using PCT, minimizing sample loss, increasing throughput to 16 concurrently processed samples, and decreasing sample processing time to under 8 hours. PCT methods produced similar proteomes in comparison to previous methods. Two solvents which were ineffective at extracting proteins from the adhesive at ambient pressure urea and methanol produced more protein identifications under pressure than highly polar hexafluoroisopropanol, leading to the identification and description of 40 novel proteins at the interface. Some of these have homology to proteins with elastomeric properties or domains involved with protein-protein interactions, while many have no sequence similarity to proteins in publicly available databases, highlighting the unique adherent processes evolved by barnacles. The methods described here can not only be used to further characterize barnacle adhesive to combat fouling, but may also be applied to other recalcitrant biological samples, including aggregative or fibrillar protein matrices produced during disease, where a lack of efficient sample processing methods has impeded advancement. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD012730.

Subject Categories:

  • Genetic Engineering and Molecular Biology
  • Numerical Mathematics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE