Accession Number:

AD1076134

Title:

Army Leader Development and Leadership: Views from the Field

Descriptive Note:

Journal Article - Open Access

Corporate Author:

ARMY RESEARCH INST FOR THE BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES FORT BELVOIR VA FORT BELVOIR United States

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2012-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

7.0

Abstract:

The Center for Army Leadership CAL Annual Survey of Army Leadership CASAL assesses and tracks trends in Army leader attitudes, leader development, quality of leadership, and the contribution of leadership to mission accomplishment. Over 100 questions cover topics on the quality of leadership and leader development. The results of the 2010 CASAL are summarized here in three main sections leader development, effects of character and climate on leadership, and professional military education PME in leader development. The CASAL provides research guidance for policy decisions and program development. It is an authoritative source that uses a large, random representative sample and a rigorous scientific approach for survey development, data collection, and data analysis, and it calibrates its findings with other Army research. Data was collected online from a representative sample of over 22,000 Regular Army, Army Reserve, and Army National Guard officers. Approximately 22,500 Army leaders participated, with a response rate of 16.1 percent. The large, random representative sample, combined with comparisons with other Army research, allows for high confidence in the accuracy of these findings. Responses are both quantitative and qualitative. Trend data indicates that Army leaders are lacking in developing their subordinates for future leadership roles. Data collected from 2006 to 2010 consistently show that Develops Others is the lowest rated Army Leader Core Competency. A two-thirds favorability rating has been established in research as a threshold for acceptability. Since 2006, no more than 61 percent of active duty Army leaders have rated Develops Others favorably. While this competency has improved in the last several years, it is still well below the acceptability threshold and rated much lower than all other core competencies.

Subject Categories:

  • Military Forces and Organizations
  • Administration and Management
  • Psychology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE