Accession Number:

AD1071096

Title:

Operationalizing the Army Learning Strategy in Unit Collective Training

Descriptive Note:

Technical Report,01 Jun 2017,31 May 2018

Corporate Author:

US Army School for Advanced Military Studies Fort Leavenworth United States

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2018-05-24

Pagination or Media Count:

52.0

Abstract:

The US Army created the Army Learning Strategy in response to the anticipated demands of dynamic and complex future operational environment as described in the Army Operating Concept Win in a Complex World, 2020-2040 AOC 2020-2040. The strategy describes how the Army should evolve its conceptualization, delivery, and management of all learning opportunities across the force, including both training and education. The strategy calls for the effective application of learning theory in both training and education, through learning science principles and instructional techniques. It does not, however, specify which learning theories or concepts the Army should apply. To apply this new strategy in collective training occurring in the operational force, training methodologies should be informed by learning theories that enable maximum transfer of knowledge. This monograph examines the applicability of adult learning theory in unit collective training. Two case studies, the mobilization for World War II and the Training Revolution of the 1970s and 1980s, provide background and evidence for analysis of linkages between learning theories, training methodologies, and operational concepts. Analysis of these case studies illustrates how learning theories can inform unit training to achieve specific learning outcomes. This monograph further synthesizes the findings from the two case studies and the training outcomes required by current doctrine and describes how additional learning theories can complement and improve training methodologies. These findings offer insight for planners and leaders to develop unit training methodologies to achieve maximum knowledge transfer.

Subject Categories:

  • Psychology
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE