Accession Number:

AD1071008

Title:

Infantry Magazine. Volume 107, Number 3. July-September 2018

Descriptive Note:

Journal Article - Open Access

Corporate Author:

ARMY INFANTRY SCHOOL FORT BENNING GA FORT BENNING United States

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2018-07-01

Pagination or Media Count:

55.0

Abstract:

The mission of the Infantry is to close with the enemy by means of fire and maneuver in order to destroy or capture him, or to repel his assault with fire, maneuver, close combat, and counterattack. The oldest branch in the U.S. Army, the Infantry is proud of its mission and proud of our role in defining our Nations history. However, in accomplishing our mission and fighting on to the objective, the Infantry incurs between 70-90 percent of all casualties sustained in combat. To the uninitiated, the Infantry fight is a close-in, no-holds-barred fight on the objective in very close quarters it is unique in that it is both very personal and impersonal at its core. In every respect, our Infantry requires a special type of Soldier one who is willing to perform the tough, hardhitting duties necessary to win on the modern battlefield. I am incredibly proud and humbled to serve as the Chief of our Infantry. I am also honored to serve as both the U.S. Army Infantry School Commandant and as the Director of the Soldier Lethality Cross Functional Team SL-CFT. This SL-CFT is directly responsible for modernizing our close combat Soldiers. Informed by observations following my first 90 days in position, I offer the following to the field 1. In all operational environments and under all conditions, our Infantry continues to lead the way while deployed around the world in support of combat operations and deterrence efforts. In accomplishing their mission, our Infantry Soldiers are defeating our adversaries, deterring aggressive competitors, and reassuring our Allies and partners. The demand for our Infantry has also never been higher, concurrent with both the recent growth ofSecurity Force Advise and Assist Brigades SFABs and the transformation of Infantry One-Station Unit Training OSUT at Fort Benning. Both of these efforts require increased numbers of highly experienced and professional Infantry officers and NCOs.

Subject Categories:

  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics
  • Military Forces and Organizations
  • Administration and Management

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE