Accession Number:

AD1057792

Title:

A Micro-CT-Based Method for Quantitative Brain Lesion Characterization and Electrode Localization

Descriptive Note:

Journal Article - Open Access

Corporate Author:

Harvard University Cambridge United States

Report Date:

2018-03-26

Pagination or Media Count:

14.0

Abstract:

Lesion verification and quantification is traditionally done via histological examination of sectioned brains, a time-consuming process that relies heavily on manual estimation. Such methods are particularly problematic in posterior cortical regions e.g. visual cortex, where sectioning leads to significant damage and distortion of tissue. Even more challenging is the post hoc localization of microelectrodes, which relies on the same techniques, suffers from similar drawbacks and requires even higher precision. Here, we propose a new, simple method for quantitative lesion characterization and electrode localization that is less labor-intensive and yields more detailed results than conventional methods. We leverage staiLesion verification and quantification is traditionally done via histological examination of sectioned brains, a time-consuming process that relies heavily on manual estimation. Such methods are particularly problematic in posterior cortical regions e.g. visual cortex, where sectioning leads to significant damage and distortion of tissue. Even more challenging is the post hoc localization of microelectrodes, which relies on the same techniques, suffers from similar drawbacks and requires even higher precision. Here, we propose a new, simple method for quantitative lesion characterization and electrode localizning techniques standard in electron microscopy with the use of commodity micro-CT imaging. We stain whole rat and zebra finch brains in osmium tetroxide, embed these in resin and scan entire brains in a micro-CT machine. The scans result in 3D reconstructions of the brains with section thickness dependent on sample size 1215 and 56 microns for rat and zebra finch respectively that can be segmented manually or automatically. Because the method captures the entire intact brain volume, comparisons within and across studies are more tractable, and the extent of lesions and electrodes may be studied with higher accuracy than with current methods.

Subject Categories:

  • Anatomy and Physiology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE